Germany to legalize marijuana or not? 420 With CNW

Uncertainty Grows Over When Germany Will Legalize Marijuana

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Cannabis is the new trend in Germany. The coalition government of center-left Social Democrats (SPD), environmentalist Greens and neoliberal Free Democrats (FDP) stated clearly: “We are introducing the controlled supply of recreational cannabis to adults in licensed shops.”

To turn these words into practical policies, however, is proving to be a monumental task.

It involves almost every federal government ministry. And the fact that so many bodies are involved makes the legislative process very complex, the government’s drug and addiction commissioner Burkhard Blienert told DW. “It encompasses agriculture, youth protection, policing, tax issues and much more,” he said.

The way forward is as ambitious as it is open-ended. “The agreement is that the federal government will adopt key points in the fall and will draft a law on this basis. It will then be deliberated in parliament. I anticipate this will happen next year. When the law will be passed and come into force: That is in the hands of the parliament,” drug commissioner Blienert said.

Until then, many questions need to be resolved. A key one: Where does cannabis come from?

Industry representative Heitepriem sees little room for international trade and importing from traditional growers such as Morocco or Lebanon. “The UN conventions stand in our way, as do European regulations,” Heitepriem said, adding: “We assume that there will need to be in-country production, at least initially. This requires massive investment and, above all, a lead time of 1 1/2 to two years to provide the necessary production capacities.”

“The goal is a coherent concept that makes it possible for adults to obtain cannabis in licensed specialty shops, ensuring health protection and the protection of minors.”

To turn these words into practical policies, however, is proving to be a monumental task.

It involves almost every federal government ministry. And the fact that so many bodies are involved makes the legislative process very complex, the government’s drug and addiction commissioner Burkhard Blienert told DW. “It encompasses agriculture, youth protection, policing, tax issues and much more,” he said.

“The goal is a coherent concept that makes it possible for adults to obtain cannabis in licensed specialty shops, ensuring health protection and the protection of minors.”

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